(CNN) — All BlackBerry did Wednesday was change its corporate name, introduce two new smartphones and launch a bold new mobile operating system, BlackBerry 10, that may be the struggling company’s last stab at relevance.
Now it’s up to consumers to render a verdict on whether BlackBerry’s new offerings — the all-touchscreen Z10 phone and the Q10, which still has a keyboard — are worth buying over iPhones or Android devices.
BlackBerry (they’re now no longer known as Research in Motion) still has some work to do, and early reviews of BlackBerry 10 have been mixed. But there are some promising signs out there.

(Reuters) — Research In Motion Ltd unveiled the long-delayed line of smartphones it hopes will put it on the comeback trail on Wednesday but it disappointed investors by saying U.S. sales of its all-new BlackBerry 10 will start only in March.

Chief Executive Thorsten Heins also announced that RIM was abandoning the name it has used since its inception in 1985 to take the name of its signature product, signaling his hopes for a fresh start for the company that pioneered on-your-hip email.

(LA Times) — BlackBerry maker Research in Motion reinvented itself with a revamped operating system, two new smartphones and a name change during a global launch Wednesday.

The Canadian smartphone maker — cast off by many consumers and analysts as a has-been tech company struggling to stay afloat — showed off its long-overdue BlackBerry 10 operating system and two phones: the touchscreen-only Z10 and a traditional physical keyboard model called the Q10.

BlackBerry 10 features include separate work and personal profiles; time-saving ways to multi-task without closing applications; video chat with live screensharing; and more than 70,000 apps. The touchscreen on the Z10 has already earned early raves for its accurate auto-correct and predictive text, multi-language capabilities within the same email and use of flicks and swipes to quickly select or delete words.

(ABC News) — It was 2008 and my BlackBerry Curve’s BBM was overflowing with contacts. I’d plug away on the physical keyboard, quickly firing off messages and emails to my friends and colleagues. Back then, most of them had the same phone or another one of RIM’s popular handsets, like the BlackBerry Pearl.

By 2010 that list of contacts was empty. All my friends had abandoned BlackBerrys for iPhones or Android phones. I did the same. What choice did we have? While Apple and other phone makers started making phones that did amazing things with rich applications and fast Web browsers, BlackBerry clung to its outdated phone software.

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